Coeur du Berry

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The Coeur du Berry is a beautiful heart-shape fresh goat cheese (coeur in French means heart), made of pasteurised milk covered with ash.
It is a semi-soft cheese made in the small village ‘St Valentin’, from the Berry region, where it gets its name from, located south of Loire river, in the centre of France. This mouth-watering cheese is produced by Fromagerie Jacquin & Fils, a company who have been making goats cheese for over 60 years.

The cheese is characterised by a mixture of a smoky ash coated rind with a blue and white mould combination. The aroma has a light pungency and an essence of a maturation room with mould spores. The central pâte is pure white with a darker and softer colour and texture on the outside.
Cœur du Berry is a rich mellow goats cheese with tangy notes and bold earthy flavours. It is soft inside, and will evolve more complex flavours the longer you keep it.

The bovine’s food affects their milk which, in turn, affects the flavour and texture of their cheese, so the best seasons for this delicacy are the end of spring, summer and fall, as goat milk is richer.
Light and mildly sweet, this cheese will pair well with a light, crisp and fruity wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc Sancerre or a Menetou-Salon blanc.
It is an extremely enjoyable goats cheese which has a very clean finish and this is certainly a cheeseboard cheese to have with a finer selection of cheeses.
Delicious eaten with some fruit like berries or grapes as this would work beautifully because of the creamy nature of the cheese.

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